Mystic wealth

Mystic wealth

Friday, 20 June 2014

Treasured Masterpieces of Ancient Chinese Imperial Treasure Exhibiting in Japan for the First Time

Hundreds of artefacts and artworks from the Taipei National Palace Museum were due to go on display in Japan for the first time.
But Taiwan threatened to cancel the event after it emerged that the word “national” had been omitted from a number of promotional posters and tickets.
The name issue has long been a sensitive topic for Taiwan, which is recognised by only 22 countries after a decades-old diplomatic tug-of-war with China from which it split in 1949.

In order to give its artifacts and artwork on loan, the NPM wanted guarantees from the Japan government, not only from the museums, that its masterpieces would be sent back after the exhibit in Taipei.

For this reason, Taiwan does not send its works of art to states that do not have specific laws on the matter. So imagine  How the leader of the  Taiwan   will feel  ,as  Taiwanese noticed the "National " word  is  missing .
Guaranteess from Japan  become a worrisome commitment  ; To  them as the Missing  Word on the brochure , may not be that serious  ,But  The Heritage  of Chinese 's 500 years  History and Culture  may be at risk  therefore   such   Careless mistake  cannot  be Taken Too for Granted .


In the  past  since   1991, Taiwan  sent various works of art to countries that offered legal guarantees," said NPM Director Dr Feng  , and Other Countries in the region  may be  given similar opportunites in the near future  except maybe China .  Similar agreements have been signed in the past with the United States, France, Germany and Austria.

Among the museums that preserve the masterpieces of Chinese art, the one in Taipei has the same origin as the Palace Museum in Beijing's Forbidden City
Taiwan's NPM holds in fact more than 696,000 artefacts brought from Beijing to Taiwan after the civil war in mainland China.

The disagreement broke out  in Mid June  2014  after the name of Taiwan’s national museum was changed in promotional posters advertising an upcoming exhibition in Japan — a spat that highlighted Taipei’s sensitivity over its global  diplomatic status.
Hundreds of artifacts and artworks from the Taipei National Palace Museum were due to go on display in Japan for the first time.
But Taiwan threatened to cancel the event after it emerged that the word “national” had been omitted from a number of promotional posters and tickets.

The name issue has long been a sensitive topic for Taiwan, which is recognised by only 22 countries after a decades-old diplomatic tug-of-war with China from which it split in 1949.
The row was solved at the last minute after the Tokyo National Museum, the exhibition’s main sponsor, fixed the problematic posters, museum officials in Taipei said.

A Taiwan Spokewoman  added that the Tokyo museum owes Taiwan an apology for its mistake. Taiwanese officials have insisted the Tokyo museum guaranteed in a contract that the lender’s full name would be used and that the word “national” would not be omitted.

Japan, like most countries, has diplomatic ties with Beijing rather than Taipei. But it maintains close trade and other ties with Taiwan, which was its colony from 1895 to 1945.
The National Palace Museum last year announced the loan of 231 artefacts to Japan, its first to an Asian country, following exhibitions in the United States, France, Germany and Austria.
The museum’s contents — one of the world’s finest collections of Chinese treasures — mostly came from Beijing’s Forbidden City.
They were brought to the island by Nationalist leader Chiang Kai-shek, when he fled to Taiwan after losing the Chinese civil war to the communists in 1949.

For years the National Palace Museum was unwilling to lend the artefacts to Japan for fear that China would try to reclaim them, until the Japanese government passed a law in 2011 to prevent such seizures.
China regards Taiwan as part of its territory awaiting reunification, by force if necessary, although tensions have eased markedly since Taiwan’s President Ma  Took Office

Origin of Ancient Chinese Imperial Treasure


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